It's Always a Matter of Size

0040.jpg
Design: Pietro Russo | Milan, Italy

Design: Pietro Russo | Milan, Italy

Necessity is said to be the mother of all invention. And that is exactly what designer Pietro Russo put to good use when designing his own home. Wanting to fit and incorporate a cadenza that wasn’t quite suitable in depth, as the room was too narrow. Solution: carve open the wall and insert. -tM

How Deep Is Your Love?

Architecture: Roger Dean | Green Style; Willowater

Architecture: Roger Dean | Green Style; Willowater

Peace, Love, and Sustainability are the design backbone to these eco-friendly apartments.

All of the suites follow the curved lines of the human psyche in relation to interior spaces. Dean found that we crave spaces that not only look good, but feel good, and according to him the curvilinear line does just that. Perhaps it is a throwback to the womb in conception; however primitive in origin, its movement is both progressive in thought and design, shifting our perception of what it means to live in a community that works in harmony with nature, design, and economics. -tM

Love Affairs

Architecture: Ricardo Bofil | Spain

Architecture: Ricardo Bofil | Spain

Moving toward the sun,

today and everyday he comes out to play. I no longer have to rely on my memory of the him, now I engage in playful moments of public and private happiness with him by my side. Secret days are spent lingering in the intimacy of his embrace.

Oh how I love his convivial kisses and will enjoy them while they last, for it is my destiny to love and say good bye to him. -tM

Cocktails & Chill

Winding down for the holidays has made me long for nights by the Mediterranean and silent days spent in frivolity. The playful interior of this hideaway nestled in among the olive groves definitely sets the stage for my summer dreaming (expand to get the full calm down effect). -tM

Brutalism Meet Romance

This could very well come close to being my dream space. Rooms organized by mental and psychological activities, a space that is expansive, creative, minimalist, and allows others to live freely without crossing paths unless consciously desiring so; both thoughtful in design, and necessary for a creative to thrive in.

I am beyond moved by the beauty and intelligence of this space. -tM

 

I Can Feel the Dance in her Soul

Artist: Degas | Little Dancer, age 14 | National Gallery

Artist: Degas | Little Dancer, age 14 | National Gallery

“The Dancer premiered in 1881 at the Sixth Impressionist Exhibition in Paris, where it spurred condemnation for its “low” realism that many commentors considered vulgar. She stood as an indecently naturalistic portrayal of a working-class dancer, linked to nebulous ideas of vice, degeneracy, and corruption.”

She originally came to be known as the “Unloved Dancer.”

The world was appalled by her realism. It was the first modern attempt at a realistic sculpture. But the original unloved, wigged, and slippered Dancer no longer exists. The 1881 version was made entirely out of wax, which began to darken. It was later replaced with a simplified revised version also made of wax (as no one wanted to buy the original) Today, there are 30 of these bronze cast dancers around the world that were some what born out of Degas’ original. Plaster mould’s were made after Degas’ death in 1921 of a less detailed version of the unsellable original that Degas had later created. Degas’ revised wax rendition currently resides in the National Gallery in Washington, DC.

Now cloned, and idealized, the new version has been whole heartedly accepted by the masses, yet I still have a longing to be witness to the original. It just goes to show you how uninterested we as humans are in having realism find its way into our art, and how uncomfortable it is when it does, as it interferes with our ability to escape reality. -tM

A Reminder to be Playful

Photography: Alexis Armanet | Giorgio Armani’s Milanese Palace

Photography: Alexis Armanet | Giorgio Armani’s Milanese Palace

A reminder to be playful in life and design, that is what this image implores of me.

The unexpected placement of these two bronze panthers circa 1930, in the middle of the hallway, stand in contrast to there surroundings. They require you to stop, look, engage, and acknowledge there beauty and position. Playing with the rules, in life and in design is good for the soul. -tM

The Walls are a Talkin’

Design: Dimore Studio Gallery | Milan Design Week 2019

Design: Dimore Studio Gallery | Milan Design Week 2019

Uffff, how I adore this wallpaper.

Vintage & sexy, it conjures up all kinds of feelings, and lends itself to many interpretations depending on the accessories; from tacky, to dirty old man, or perhaps eclectic older woman, to an abandoned parlour where dusty old books sit, waiting to be handled again, and lastly, classic and timeless. That is the thing about animal print, it can be all of the above depending on presentation.

I find it interesting that this particular presentation makes me feel many things. You don’t have to be a fly on the wall to hear what the walls are saying here. -tM

Lauré Prouvost

A multi media Artist, Lauré`s work is thought provoking to say the least. These are just a few selections of different mediums she continues to work with. They vary from sculpture, installations, video, tapestry, performance art, to name a few. She tells stories through art that explore the fine lines of balance between fiction and reality through personal myth and universal themes. -tM

Curtain Play

Photography: Unknown

Photography: Unknown

When architects began to design homes and spaces with large windows, curtains became an important element of interior design and architecture.

However, lately there has been a shift away (at least here in N. America) from curtains and a push toward blinds. I miss the romance and ritual of drawing the curtains closed. I miss the sensuality of the sun peaking through mid day; curtains swaying in wind, encouraging the merging two worlds.

Another time and place, saw me draw the sheers open and closed, depending on the sun, and often of the positioning of the moon, as this became standard, so did the stories of disillusion, fear, promise, and hope. There were always lessons to be learned at the edge of the window sill and in the rustling of the curtains. —tM

Penises of the Ancient World

So in the name of research I stumbled upon these ancient relics from the Roman Empire. The first being door knobs, the second being an assortment of chimes and decorative flying penises that were often hung above doors, inside and out as protective talisman’s and in worship of fecundity.

You see most civilisations, Greeks, and Egyptians alike, worshipped sex and God in much the same light. There was little to no separation. To be able to have sex and enjoy it freely was the ultimate gift of the gods, and to procreate was a miracle in the making, hence the penis envy.

However, I would like to know why they didn’t celebrate the vagina in much the same fashion. Perhaps the penis was easier to replicate in form and in shape.

Yeah, that must have been the case. ;) -tM

Sculptural Shadow Art

Tim Noble & Sue Webster are a London-based artist duo that create shadow art installations using carefully arranged objects. Using everything from trash to metal cans shot with BB pellets, they arrange these found objects in such a way as to cast shadows of people and skylines on the wall when a light is shined from a certain direction.

Photgraphy: Tim Noble & Sue Webster