I Can Feel the Dance in her Soul

Artist: Degas | Little Dancer, age 14 | National Gallery

Artist: Degas | Little Dancer, age 14 | National Gallery

“The Dancer premiered in 1881 at the Sixth Impressionist Exhibition in Paris, where it spurred condemnation for its “low” realism that many commentors considered vulgar. She stood as an indecently naturalistic portrayal of a working-class dancer, linked to nebulous ideas of vice, degeneracy, and corruption.”

She originally came to be known as the “Unloved Dancer.”

The world was appalled by her realism. It was the first modern attempt at a realistic sculpture. But the original unloved, wigged, and slippered Dancer no longer exists. The 1881 version was made entirely out of wax, which began to darken. It was later replaced with a simplified revised version also made of wax (as no one wanted to buy the original) Today, there are 30 of these bronze cast dancers around the world that were some what born out of Degas’ original. Plaster mould’s were made after Degas’ death in 1921 of a less detailed version of the unsellable original that Degas had later created. Degas’ revised wax rendition currently resides in the National Gallery in Washington, DC.

Now cloned, and idealized, the new version has been whole heartedly accepted by the masses, yet I still have a longing to be witness to the original. It just goes to show you how uninterested we as humans are in having realism find its way into our art, and how uncomfortable it is when it does, as it interferes with our ability to escape reality. -tM

A Reminder to be Playful

Photography: Alexis Armanet | Giorgio Armani’s Milanese Palace

Photography: Alexis Armanet | Giorgio Armani’s Milanese Palace

A reminder to be playful in life and design, that is what this image implores of me.

The unexpected placement of these two bronze panthers circa 1930, in the middle of the hallway, stand in contrast to there surroundings. They require you to stop, look, engage, and acknowledge there beauty and position. Playing with the rules, in life and in design is good for the soul. -tM

The Walls are a Talkin’

Design: Dimore Studio Gallery | Milan Design Week 2019

Design: Dimore Studio Gallery | Milan Design Week 2019

Uffff, how I adore this wallpaper.

Vintage & sexy, it conjures up all kinds of feelings, and lends itself to many interpretations depending on the accessories; from tacky, to dirty old man, or perhaps eclectic older woman, to an abandoned parlour where dusty old books sit, waiting to be handled again, and lastly, classic and timeless. That is the thing about animal print, it can be all of the above depending on presentation.

I find it interesting that this particular presentation makes me feel many things. You don’t have to be a fly on the wall to hear what the walls are saying here. -tM

Lauré Prouvost

A multi media Artist, Lauré`s work is thought provoking to say the least. These are just a few selections of different mediums she continues to work with. They vary from sculpture, installations, video, tapestry, performance art, to name a few. She tells stories through art that explore the fine lines of balance between fiction and reality through personal myth and universal themes. -tM

Curtain Play

Photography: Unknown

Photography: Unknown

When architects began to design homes and spaces with large windows, curtains became an important element of interior design and architecture.

However, lately there has been a shift away (at least here in N. America) from curtains and a push toward blinds. I miss the romance and ritual of drawing the curtains closed. I miss the sensuality of the sun peaking through mid day; curtains swaying in wind, encouraging the merging two worlds.

Another time and place, saw me draw the sheers open and closed, depending on the sun, and often of the positioning of the moon, as this became standard, so did the stories of disillusion, fear, promise, and hope. There were always lessons to be learned at the edge of the window sill and in the rustling of the curtains. —tM

Penises of the Ancient World

So in the name of research I stumbled upon these ancient relics from the Roman Empire. The first being door knobs, the second being an assortment of chimes and decorative flying penises that were often hung above doors, inside and out as protective talisman’s and in worship of fecundity.

You see most civilisations, Greeks, and Egyptians alike, worshipped sex and God in much the same light. There was little to no separation. To be able to have sex and enjoy it freely was the ultimate gift of the gods, and to procreate was a miracle in the making, hence the penis envy.

However, I would like to know why they didn’t celebrate the vagina in much the same fashion. Perhaps the penis was easier to replicate in form and in shape.

Yeah, that must have been the case. ;) -tM

Sculptural Shadow Art

Tim Noble & Sue Webster are a London-based artist duo that create shadow art installations using carefully arranged objects. Using everything from trash to metal cans shot with BB pellets, they arrange these found objects in such a way as to cast shadows of people and skylines on the wall when a light is shined from a certain direction.

Photgraphy: Tim Noble & Sue Webster

PSA

For anyone out there who loves chocolate as much as I do, this is a brand to try.

These chocolates are one of the most delectable, purest, cleanest tasting bars I have ever had the pleasure of letting melt onto my tongue. They are locally made in Toronto and can be found in health food stores, some local convenient stores, and speciality shops. There are many varieties and flavours to choose from. I am personally a fan of the one above, the dark chocolate sea salt blend (blended with just the right amount of salt), and also the espresso bean crunch.

I promise you’ll be thanking me later. -tM

Photography: tM

Hair Highway

STUDIO SWINE - HAIR HIGHWAY

Hair Highway is a contemporary take on the ancient Silk Road. As the world’s population continues to increase, human hair has been re-imagined as an abundant and renewable material, with China being the biggest exporter of human hair.

By combining hair with a natural resin, Studio Swine has created a composite material that provides a sustainable alternative to the planet’s diminishing natural resources with an aesthetic that evokes the palettes of tortoiseshell and a grain resembling that of polished horn or exotic hardwoods. The result is a unique collection of exquisite objects inspired by the 1930’s Shanghai-deco style.

The film documents the hair trade and industry in the Shandong province of China. Following the journey of the material from the people who sell their hair through to the hair merchants, markets and factories. To finally end up in a collection of highly decorative objects created by Studio Swine.

The Fruits of Creativity

Photography: Unknown

Photography: Unknown

Doors hiding behind terrazzo walls and vertical hand railings help one up the curvature of a stair.

They say for creativity to be successful you need to have 1. originality, 2. usefulness, 3. an idea built on a new foundation containing the element of surprise.

I think this foyer has hit the mark on all of the above. -tM

1867 Bathing Rituals

Photography: 1stdibs

Photography: 1stdibs

FOR SALE:

Baldi proudly presents a truly unique item, a one-of-a-kind masterpiece: a Rose Quartz crystal bathtub.

Priced at 1 million Euros, the astonishing bath was carved out of a single block of Rose Quartz Crystal found in the Amazonian rainforest, weighting approx. 10,000 kg.

The Baldi’s creative director, Luca Bojola, decided to keep the outer part rough not to hide the natural beauty of the crystal. Comparable to Renaissance creations, Its a work of art which testifies the beauty of nature meeting design.

Made in Firenze, 1867.

What an incredible piece of historical art. -tM