Fascinations

Photography: Unknown

Photography: Unknown

I am unable to read the script, which in this case I think is a good thing because it peaks my curiousity. Optometrist? Herbalist for sight? Aesthetician? A home of a superstitious person who is trying their best to ward off the evil eye? These are all valid possibilities in my mind.

There are even many evil eyes positioned behind the tea kettle. I feel like the tea kettle could be a clue, and it looks like there are cups sitting on the ledge of the other open window. I can’t “see” any further then this without the knowledge of the script.

I give up, pizza parlour? What do you surmise? -tM

Under the Skin

Artist: Gael Davrinche | Under the Skin

Artist: Gael Davrinche | Under the Skin

This made me laugh. Perhaps it shouldn’t, but it did. I know one could go into a deep analysis of this painting given the title of the series, however, this stands as an obvious reminder to me of all the people I have encountered along the way, who, “underneath” it all have been everything but beautiful.

Inside turned out. This is quite a catastrophe of a piece, and of course I mean that in the best way possible. -tM

p.s. I am still laughing

My, What Big Ears You Have

Artist: Gael Davrinche | Contemporary Realism

Artist: Gael Davrinche | Contemporary Realism

We all know someone or have known someone who hears and see’s everything, who either “claim” to have overheard the juicy details or were privy to being at the right place at the right time. This is otherwise known as the snoop or the town gossip; big ears, and even bigger mouth.

If they talk about someone else, they will most definitely talk about you. So I stay clear. I don’t want to know peoples dirty laundry, I do not want to participate in bringing someone down, in helping spread word about a situation or current life struggle. And as of lately if and when I begin to judge someone on their behaviour, dress, or otherwise, I stop myself, and that little voice in my head tells me to shut the f*&$ up, because in reality, I need to divert that energy toward me, toward bettering myself, fixing what I believe needs fixing.

I understand the human draw toward these types of headlines, what else was there to do when people didn’t have t.v., lived in a town of a few hundred, and needed some form of entertainment. People are people, and although still entertaining, gossip can also be incredibly damaging.

There has got to be another way for all of us to feel accepted by others without the spread of such tales.

So the moral of this story friends is: steer clear of those with a big mouth and big ears, for like the wolf in “The Little Red Riding Hood” they may be charming but they too will eventually come for you. Trust your instincts and keep moving on. -tM

The Unexpected

Photography: Erik Melvin

Photography: Erik Melvin

I like when confronted with the unexpected in design and in people.

It’s in those moments that I am reminded of the creative forces in life, of making a space your own, not what the latest Pottery Barn suggests you do. And in person, I appreciate the courage of those who choose not to conform to anyone else’s standards but their own. It's translates into a beautiful self-assurance, a confidence so engagingly unconventional, that in my opinion lights up the world.

But then again, I have always been drawn to the unconventional, in people and in place, it’s just who I am. -tM

The Telephone Seat: More then Meets the Eye

Photography & Design: Unknown

Photography & Design: Unknown

I used to watch my mom sit and talk sometimes for hours late in the evening at her telephone seat with coffee in hand, and an occasional cigarette. Our telephone seat was nestled in a corner of our long hallway, situated close to the piano. The piano was an upright, allowing for some privacy if necessary.

I have always liked the idea of a place solely made for talking, a place that became an island of alone time. Once that receiver was in hand, the world would fall away, or at least that was what I felt I bore witness too, as we were not to disturb my mother when on call, for all intensive purposes my sister and I ceased to exist in those moments.

There was something so organic about the connections made over those wires, it was the next best thing to seeing her friends in person. It was a moment that didn’t require multi tasking (walking with your cell, or folding laundry with your cordless) the telephone seat and landline rotary phone plugged into the wall made certain of that. They were simpler times made more beautiful by the furniture designed for its utilitarian purpose.

I don’t recall the actual year or day that my parents got rid of the telephone seat (it was taking up too much space) and replaced it with just a telephone table whose perimeter would eventually come to be known as our shoe dispensary, but I remember that soon after that, our telephone cords were extended, doors were closed for privacy, and conversations no longer came with coffee, or cigarette rituals.

Change is inevitable, and design is consistently reinventing itself, but with every technological advance comes a loss of a simpler time.

I still have that rotary phone, sitting in my closet. I keep it as a memento of what once was and no longer is.

Ah, nostalgia, it can be so bittersweet. -tM

A Side for you, A Side for Me

Design: Unknown

Design: Unknown

I want to look at you when you speak to me. I want that intimacy, in person, and across from me. I want to fall into those gestures, the details of your face, your own specific qualities. It’s these details that move me, that create a visual intimacy, the things that find there way into memory. At least in my mind. -tM

The Landscape Houses of Alberto Ponis

A series of holiday homes built in the 1960’s melt into the environment that dictated their design.

Swimming Pool at the foot of the house of Costa Gostner.

Swimming Pool at the foot of the house of Costa Gostner.

Stairs dug into the rock of Casa Bak (1968).

Stairs dug into the rock of Casa Bak (1968).

Central Chimney of Sudio di Yasmin (1971), evoking the circular plan of the home.

Central Chimney of Sudio di Yasmin (1971), evoking the circular plan of the home.

Casa di Ivan, a wide tiled home resembling a starfish.

Casa di Ivan, a wide tiled home resembling a starfish.

Casa Hartley almost completely disappears between the rocks and cliffs that overlook the ocean.

Casa Hartley almost completely disappears between the rocks and cliffs that overlook the ocean.

Casa Scalesciana, sits suspended above the sea.

Casa Scalesciana, sits suspended above the sea.

Paintings & Provocations

Artist: Balthus | Thérese Dreaming, 1938

Artist: Balthus | Thérese Dreaming, 1938

I find this painting enchanting and restorative. I do not understand the controversy around this piece as being disturbing and offensive. There is nothing salacious about it in my view.

I understand all art is subjective and that we cast onto it our own personal gaze of experience, however, to have such a piece censored from show, points to a sad state of affairs in our creative world. Is our culture so terrified of sexually awakened girls, of the interior lives of youth, or perhaps it is ourselves that we fear the most?

All I know is that this painting reminds me of what it means to fall into oneself, to shut out the world in daydream.

So if museums need to warn people of arts content on plaques before entering, so be it, because she is too beautiful not to be seen up close and in person. -tM

Art, Design, and Philosophy

Some things to ponder alongside your other Monday fascinations:

"A well designed room should look like you could just walk in and be naked anywhere."

"Play with your sexual fantasies and reverse anything that could be destructive into something positive."

"Find your inner woman, or you're not really a man." -Tom Bianchi

The Rhythm is Gonna Get You

Photography: Ruth Orkin

Photography: Ruth Orkin

Back to front, handbag on foot, foot in hand, heel to heel, curve to curve, nudity to Sunday best, life to art, art to life, hand to thigh, hip to hand, a power pose made grandeur by a supportive gesture, looking away to looking directly at, walking off to stopping by, heel to toe, click to clack…and the beat goes on…-tM

“Composition is selective improvisation” Igor Stravinsky

An Ode to Yellow

A colour often synonymous with the free loving 60’s & 70’s, seems to have somewhat disappeared design wise. The above is a visual ode to the colour itself, used as an accent or in its entirety, yellow marries well with so many colours, and there are so many versions of it to fall in love with.

I remember a girlfriend (who is Irish herself) told me that if you see a house with a yellow painted door, you’d better believe that those residing inside are Irish. It’s a distinctive colour, that can be bold as much as it can be soft, however, anyway you look at it yellow means standing away from the crowd.

I think those who accept yellow into their lives through interior design or otherwise don’t take themselves too seriously.

It’s a statement, as are all colours, however this one not so subtle in its display. -tM

Photography: Unknown; Image No. 3 & 4 DIMORE Studio Design