A Purse-onal Affair

Oh the fascinations of digging through ones purse as a child were endless and also a major faux pas in my family. I was raised NEVER to go into my mothers purse, or anyone else’s for that matter without asking. I don’t know whether it was about the wallet and the money they feared I would steal or perhaps it was more about the privacy of the space which contained some of my mothers secrets, and the lessons of personal boundaries that followed.

I was recently reading an article that referred to handbags now a days as symbols that transmit messages about “taste, aspirations, and personality,” that they are to the most of us what cars are to those living in LA; they are private vessels, sealed off from the rest of the world that help carry you from Point A to B, containing the necessities you need for daily survival.

Photographer, Juergen Teller, believes that the purse is in fact a psycho-sexual object and likens the privacy intrusions into ones purse to almost feeling like a body violation; and if a high heel has a phallic connotation then why can’t the purse have a vaginal one? I know this is all very Freudian, but I have to agree that to have someone go through the contents of your purse does feel like a personal violation, whether you are hiding something or not (airport X-rays, case and point).

So whether Jeurgen photograph’s models spread eagle in bags, hands in purses intimately placed in between their legs, (hairy, furry, or smooth) there is one thing for certain, there is an implicit understanding that now a days a bag is a status accessory, as for the rest, Freudian or not, unless I give you permission keep your hands out of my purse. -tM

Photography: Juergen Teller

The Style Poetics of American Gigolo

The style codes woven into American Gigolo’s aesthetics are as timeless as they are androgynous, allowing both women and men to tap into this effortless form of sensuality.

I am newly inspired not only by the style of clothing (the suits are all designed by Armani, as it is also a well known fact this this film launched his career. Impressed with Gere’s representation of the Armani man, it is said that he never needed to pay for a suit again) but also by the interior design; relaxed, elegant, and refined. It is poetry in motion. I couldn’t have asked for a way to spend a Saturday Night. -tM

Dressing You

Photography: Unknown

Photography: Unknown

There is something so sensual about dressing the other,

the final zip of a dress, the tying of the cravat. I think it is about the close proximity as much as it is about the intimacy of the act itself.

In that moment, you take on the knowing of what it would be like to see the curves that bare the weight of those clothes, or to perhaps kiss that mouth or caress that neck where the collar meets the tie; lips sinking into flesh.

Seduction in reverse; poem of the flesh. -tM

Style for Style

 
Photography: The Sartorilaist | Milano, Italy 2019

Photography: The Sartorilaist | Milano, Italy 2019

There has always been a question of whether style is in fact innate or something that has to be learned. Regardless of what you may or may not believe, it is nice to see two generations of style side by side and the lessons that may or may not have been passed down. -tM

Who Says?

Photography: Unknown | Diana Ross, 1997

Photography: Unknown | Diana Ross, 1997

Who says you can’t dress up to walk the streets eating meat on a stick?

I have always been a firm believer in wearing your jewels, your “fancy” shoes, your beautiful handbag, great coat, sparkly top, whenever the mood strikes you. I don’t believe in saving fashion/style for a special occasion. Bust your finest out whenever the spirit catches you. If it makes you feel good, that confidence will spill over into everything you do that day.

Viva la inspiration! -tM

What are You Saying?

Photography: Unknown

Photography: Unknown

There has always been something tough about the asethetic of North American fashion, versus that of the elegance with which European fashion is conveyed. Even in our most sophisticated moments there is still this undertone of grit.

It goes to show you that fashion is so much more then the clothes that you choose to wear. It is also about attitude, culture, self-worth, creativity, social status, and a freedom of expression that is more often then not inextricably linked to where you have grown up and what you have internalized on a psychological level.

It is living art made beautiful by what you choose to say with it, in attitude and in style. -tM

Uniform Cool

Phtotography: tM

Phtotography: tM

I was struck by this man’s unique way of keeping style while in work uniform. I am not certain whether you can tell or not, but he had a large thick silver hoop earring gracing his right ear and a ring of the same stature on his left. I also love the contrast of the bandanna with his silver locks.

I immediately noticed him and payed no attention to the bikini clad sunbathers, as he weaved in and out of different projects in peace & style on a Wednesday afternoon. -tM

The 80's: Boys & their Crop Tops

Dave Gahan

Dave Gahan

Whatever happened to style? Whatever happened to the imagination that helped create an image to express who you are uniquely as an individual?

The more I look around, the less I am inspired. Teenagers, the ones that should be exploring who they are through fashion all look the same. There is a uniform for each age group it seems. I long for the days when subcultures, sprung out of the music they listened to, influenced their attitude and their style. Everything is so generic these days, creativity on all levels seems to have left the building.

The 80’s were a time of creativity and exploration. We have lost that somewhere along the way as Corporations and Fast Fashion take over and we march to the beat of another type of drum.

But then again, perhaps it is me, just getting older and longing for a time where my youth felt incredibly important and influential.

What do you think? -tM

This is Style

Photography: STYLEMONDE | Julie Pelipas; Editor of Vogue Ukaraine

Photography: STYLEMONDE | Julie Pelipas; Editor of Vogue Ukaraine

I have never been one for exposing the midriff, nor have I ever been a fan of shorts, but this is an exception.

This is what happens when you have found your own style groove. I would have never thought of putting these garments together in such a way, but then again, it’s just not me. However if I did do midriff baring shirts and shorts, I would absolutely follow suit. -tM

Fashionable Layers

Photography: Anders Enstrom

Photography: Anders Enstrom

Do you layer? And if so, how?

I have never been a fan of layering. It has always felt cumbersome, awkward, and uncomfortable, so much so that a crisp white shirt under a blazer drives me crazy because it never sits right with movement as the blazer tugs at this end or at that. The most I can do is a t-shirt under a sweater. Tights under pants, bleh, my waist feels suffocated. This is why I don’t wear skirts in the winter, the extra band around the waist leaves me feeling strangled at the midriff.

It has always just felt so heavy to me. Layering has always hindered my freedom of movement. Coats, hats, and scarves aside, it has never felt natural to me.

Perhaps I am not doing it right. I don’t know. Any tips? -tM

Tight Squeeze

Album Cover: Yeah Yeah Yeah’s

Album Cover: Yeah Yeah Yeah’s

What article of clothing are you willing to wear like a second skin if any?

Like everything in life, it is all about balance isn’t it? If you wear one article that is tight, then then other must be a little forgiving, or at least that’s how it goes in my mathematical fashion equation.

Leather pants, or denim are my tight squeeze preference, much to my mothers disappointment, as she believes that I am getting to old for such fashion exploits.

I understand her perspective but I think that everything can be made to work with the right amount of give and take when it comes to the tightness of squeeze.

Where do you draw that line? And does the age factor play into those decisions? -tM

Attention to Detail

Photography: Unknown | David Gahan, 1980’s

Photography: Unknown | David Gahan, 1980’s

I really miss the attention to detail that people would give to their wardrobes/style. I long for the days where personal grooming was equal to dignity and self-respect, when society judged you just a little more based on your appearance. Yes, you heard me, sometimes I think judgement is okay, and sometimes I feel like fear of judgement keeps us on our toes and looking just that little bit better.

You see, beauty and creativity have always been a driving force in my life, I feel inspired when I see someone dress uniquely to suit who they are, it’s personality, it’s swagger. However, for the past several years I have been getting lost in a sea of Parka’s, Canada Goose jackets, flip flops, leggings, chino’s, and wrinkled t-shirts while taking the mass transit. I no longer see anything close to inspiring.

When did it become so alright not to give a shit? When did it become okay, to wear track pants to work, and flip flops to the office? Everyone looks the same. Is this the result of people losing a sense of who they are? Are we finally devoid of personality? Has the i-phone zapped our identities? Where has that beauty of self-expression gone? How did we get here, and why is this okay? -tM

Backstage

Scenes from behind the curtain. In celebration of Fashion Month really in Europe, here are a few stand out photo’s from various shows all captured by photographer Emon Toufanian. One thing is for certain, wherever you go, or whatever you do, DO NOT leave home without your accessories. The devil still remains in the punk rock of details. Which is your favourite? -tM

l to r: Y Project; Jacquemus; Jacquemus; Rick Owens:: Rokh

Back to the Future

Photography: Unknown

Photography: Unknown

So this is how I have been wearing my hair for the past year and a half. I took the risk of cutting my bangs again, and wearing a mid length curly shag. Oh so retro you say? Well yes, and back to the past and into the present/future I have gone.

You see, this was one of my childhood haircuts. It suited me then, and it suits me now. There are a few things that need to be revisited from childhood as you age: passions, hair colour (you childhood colour will always suit you best, especially when needing to cover greys), and in my opinion haircuts. Of course you may have a variation on that said “do”, and I think the trick is to learn how to style it as an adult, but in general those youthful cuts of our past can make us look even more youthful today. Call it nostalgia, or just plain lack or creativity, all I know is that it is working for me.

How about you, what childhood style/accessories have you recently revisited? -tM

Finishing Touches

Photography: Unknown

Photography: Unknown

What are your finishing touches before leaving the house for either a day of work or an evening out?

I have four: 1. Hair needs to be coiffed; 2. Some Lipstick or lip balm, depending on whether I have made up my eyes; 3. Earrings/Necklace never both at the same time, unless I am wearing small studs; 4. Rings, always my rings which I tend to have on rotation depending on the outfit.

These are my feeling ready necessities. However, it is interesting that most revolve around my face. I guess you could say that “giving good face” is important to me. Now tell me some of your essential beauty requisites. -tM

Winter, You have a Contender

Fashion Week | Backstage at Juun J. | Self Service Magazine

Fashion Week | Backstage at Juun J. | Self Service Magazine

in keeping with NY Fashion week and its runway inspiration, this feels so right about now. Although I think I have officially traded in any style or elegance for the necessary survival gear. The only creativity applied to my attire lately is how to layer in order to keep warm. The struggle is real folks. First world problems, 2019. -tM