The Walls are a Talkin’

Design: Dimore Studio Gallery | Milan Design Week 2019

Design: Dimore Studio Gallery | Milan Design Week 2019

Uffff, how I adore this wallpaper.

Vintage & sexy, it conjures up all kinds of feelings, and lends itself to many interpretations depending on the accessories; from tacky, to dirty old man, or perhaps eclectic older woman, to an abandoned parlour where dusty old books sit, waiting to be handled again, and lastly, classic and timeless. That is the thing about animal print, it can be all of the above depending on presentation.

I find it interesting that this particular presentation makes me feel many things. You don’t have to be a fly on the wall to hear what the walls are saying here. -tM

Perfectly Not Perfect?

“Perfectionism is an excuse of being insecure.” -Paul Rudd

I was watching Actors Roundtable a few weeks back when someone quoted Paul Rudd and it made me think about perfectionism in its entirety.

Perfectionism may start out as the above, and it may continue to show its face in such form throughout ones life depending on ones approach. However perfectionism can also be about aesthetics especially in design. It can also mean practice to master an art or subject that one is passionate about.

I guess I realized that in some cases yes, perfectionism has been about hiding my insecurities, yet in other cases it had/has nothing to do with insecurity.

I think it all comes down to this: setting high standards for oneself is totally acceptable, it is what you do with those high standards that opens up the possibility of insecurity that is driven by perfectionism. If you are constantly disappointed and blaming yourself for being less then perfect, well then, I am in total agreement with the statement above.

At the end of the day it all comes down to perspective and approach, but then again, maybe I am not a true bona fide type A perfectionist then.

What are your thoughts on Perfectionism? Do you agree with the statement above? -tM

4 Simple Ways to Help Bring Balance to Your Life

Photography: Weaver Cameron Barksdale

Photography: Weaver Cameron Barksdale

  1. Simplify your day. Make a conscious effort not to plan too many things, finish one task before you move on to the other, and be in the moment.

  2. Make Nutrition a Priority. Make sure to feed and nourish yourself with good foods for your particular body and its needs. The gut is the fuel for our entire engine and if that is not working properly neither can you.

  3. Sleep Well. Lower your lights and turn off your devices at a certain time every night. Find what works for you in terms of letting go. If there is a ritual you would like to add such as a hot bath, a soothing shower, or perhaps meditation for a sense of closure on your day it is important to do so.

  4. Notice Your Thoughts. The reality is that there will always be stressful situations, however it is within our control to be able to vary our response to such outside factors. We can either add intensity to them or in turn reduce there effects. Remember that the degree of stress is a perception and that everything is temporary.

These are paraphrased suggestions by Dr. Pratima Raichur with a few additional thoughts.

Beauty Refresh

I was drawn to these photo’s because they reveal a face not so hidden by layers of make-up and Photoshop magic. I appreciate the lines and graceful bags under her eyes, the shadows of light and dark.

I think North America is in dire need of a beauty refresh. I don’t know how we got here, but we did, and it is a sad as well as ugly reality. Somehow in this process of liberating ourselves as women we have also allowed ourselves to be confined and even chained to this youthful, perfect face.

There is nothing wrong with looking like you have lived. I find the living face an incredibly beautiful and graceful face.

Perfectionism is a myth, an excuse for being insecure. It’s time to go inward for many reasons, great things always begin from the inside. -tM

Photography: Porter Magazine

Hair Highway

STUDIO SWINE - HAIR HIGHWAY

Hair Highway is a contemporary take on the ancient Silk Road. As the world’s population continues to increase, human hair has been re-imagined as an abundant and renewable material, with China being the biggest exporter of human hair.

By combining hair with a natural resin, Studio Swine has created a composite material that provides a sustainable alternative to the planet’s diminishing natural resources with an aesthetic that evokes the palettes of tortoiseshell and a grain resembling that of polished horn or exotic hardwoods. The result is a unique collection of exquisite objects inspired by the 1930’s Shanghai-deco style.

The film documents the hair trade and industry in the Shandong province of China. Following the journey of the material from the people who sell their hair through to the hair merchants, markets and factories. To finally end up in a collection of highly decorative objects created by Studio Swine.

Sunday Ease

Cinematography: Sayombhu Mukdeeprom |  Call Me By Your Name

Cinematography: Sayombhu Mukdeeprom | Call Me By Your Name

Even though we have become a secular society where Sunday’s are no longer “God’s” day of rest, where businesses are forced to remain closed and family time is a requirement (boy do I remember how boring a Sunday could be as a child, quoting Morrissey as an appropriate reference “Everyday is like Sunday, everyday is silent and grey” because that is exactly how it felt, dull, grey, and boring; lazing around all day trying to amuse oneself with play and fascination). Anyway, I digress…

As an adult, I find that I still hold onto those lazy Sunday’s as a way of life, a space for letting go, and connecting to what matters and to those I love. I consciously take it slow on a Sunday. It’s become a way of life. It is a day that I reserve solely for myself and for things that matter to me. It is my day of rest.

How about you, how do you spend your Sunday? -tM

The Fruits of Creativity

Photography: Unknown

Photography: Unknown

Doors hiding behind terrazzo walls and vertical hand railings help one up the curvature of a stair.

They say for creativity to be successful you need to have 1. originality, 2. usefulness, 3. an idea built on a new foundation containing the element of surprise.

I think this foyer has hit the mark on all of the above. -tM

1970's Curves

Designer of Sofa & Lamp: Charles Tassin

Designer of Sofa & Lamp: Charles Tassin

The design’s of the 70’s are marked by opulence of colour and luxurious materials. So sexy, so contemporary; it was a decade that mixed interior styles without hierarchy. In my opinion, the 70’s will always be a tribute to style, design, and creativity. -tM

Attention to Detail

Photography: Unknown | David Gahan, 1980’s

Photography: Unknown | David Gahan, 1980’s

I really miss the attention to detail that people would give to their wardrobes/style. I long for the days where personal grooming was equal to dignity and self-respect, when society judged you just a little more based on your appearance. Yes, you heard me, sometimes I think judgement is okay, and sometimes I feel like fear of judgement keeps us on our toes and looking just that little bit better.

You see, beauty and creativity have always been a driving force in my life, I feel inspired when I see someone dress uniquely to suit who they are, it’s personality, it’s swagger. However, for the past several years I have been getting lost in a sea of Parka’s, Canada Goose jackets, flip flops, leggings, chino’s, and wrinkled t-shirts while taking the mass transit. I no longer see anything close to inspiring.

When did it become so alright not to give a shit? When did it become okay, to wear track pants to work, and flip flops to the office? Everyone looks the same. Is this the result of people losing a sense of who they are? Are we finally devoid of personality? Has the i-phone zapped our identities? Where has that beauty of self-expression gone? How did we get here, and why is this okay? -tM

Taking Root

Blurring the lines between life and art, part sculptural installation and part public furniture piece designed by Ju Lee Architects makes hanging out in this park in Seoul Korea all the more inviting. Roots that gently rise and fall create different heights for people to lean on, sit, or lie down.

Taking inspiration from nature and encouraging our connection to it in my opinion, is always a good thing. -tM

Photography: Kyungsub Shin

The Fox is in the Pantry

Caffé La Tana, in Vancouver is a new world version of the Italian alimentari (a small family owned grocery store and deil found in small neighbourhoods throughout most of Italy). It is so full of charm and goodness that even the fox will be tamed by the in house delights.

With such clever marketing, who wouldn’t be swayed to indulge in a nostalgia and the “way things used to be.” -tM