The 80's: Boys & their Crop Tops

Dave Gahan

Dave Gahan

Whatever happened to style? Whatever happened to the imagination that helped create an image to express who you are uniquely as an individual?

The more I look around, the less I am inspired. Teenagers, the ones that should be exploring who they are through fashion all look the same. There is a uniform for each age group it seems. I long for the days when subcultures, sprung out of the music they listened to, influenced their attitude and their style. Everything is so generic these days, creativity on all levels seems to have left the building.

The 80’s were a time of creativity and exploration. We have lost that somewhere along the way as Corporations and Fast Fashion take over and we march to the beat of another type of drum.

But then again, perhaps it is me, just getting older and longing for a time where my youth felt incredibly important and influential.

What do you think? -tM

This is Style

Photography: STYLEMONDE | Julie Pelipas; Editor of Vogue Ukaraine

Photography: STYLEMONDE | Julie Pelipas; Editor of Vogue Ukaraine

I have never been one for exposing the midriff, nor have I ever been a fan of shorts, but this is an exception.

This is what happens when you have found your own style groove. I would have never thought of putting these garments together in such a way, but then again, it’s just not me. However if I did do midriff baring shirts and shorts, I would absolutely follow suit. -tM

Fashionable Layers

Photography: Anders Enstrom

Photography: Anders Enstrom

Do you layer? And if so, how?

I have never been a fan of layering. It has always felt cumbersome, awkward, and uncomfortable, so much so that a crisp white shirt under a blazer drives me crazy because it never sits right with movement as the blazer tugs at this end or at that. The most I can do is a t-shirt under a sweater. Tights under pants, bleh, my waist feels suffocated. This is why I don’t wear skirts in the winter, the extra band around the waist leaves me feeling strangled at the midriff.

It has always just felt so heavy to me. Layering has always hindered my freedom of movement. Coats, hats, and scarves aside, it has never felt natural to me.

Perhaps I am not doing it right. I don’t know. Any tips? -tM

Attention to Detail

Photography: Unknown | David Gahan, 1980’s

Photography: Unknown | David Gahan, 1980’s

I really miss the attention to detail that people would give to their wardrobes/style. I long for the days where personal grooming was equal to dignity and self-respect, when society judged you just a little more based on your appearance. Yes, you heard me, sometimes I think judgement is okay, and sometimes I feel like fear of judgement keeps us on our toes and looking just that little bit better.

You see, beauty and creativity have always been a driving force in my life, I feel inspired when I see someone dress uniquely to suit who they are, it’s personality, it’s swagger. However, for the past several years I have been getting lost in a sea of Parka’s, Canada Goose jackets, flip flops, leggings, chino’s, and wrinkled t-shirts while taking the mass transit. I no longer see anything close to inspiring.

When did it become so alright not to give a shit? When did it become okay, to wear track pants to work, and flip flops to the office? Everyone looks the same. Is this the result of people losing a sense of who they are? Are we finally devoid of personality? Has the i-phone zapped our identities? Where has that beauty of self-expression gone? How did we get here, and why is this okay? -tM

Backstage

Scenes from behind the curtain. In celebration of Fashion Month really in Europe, here are a few stand out photo’s from various shows all captured by photographer Emon Toufanian. One thing is for certain, wherever you go, or whatever you do, DO NOT leave home without your accessories. The devil still remains in the punk rock of details. Which is your favourite? -tM

l to r: Y Project; Jacquemus; Jacquemus; Rick Owens:: Rokh

Winter, You have a Contender

Fashion Week | Backstage at Juun J. | Self Service Magazine

Fashion Week | Backstage at Juun J. | Self Service Magazine

in keeping with NY Fashion week and its runway inspiration, this feels so right about now. Although I think I have officially traded in any style or elegance for the necessary survival gear. The only creativity applied to my attire lately is how to layer in order to keep warm. The struggle is real folks. First world problems, 2019. -tM

The Promise of a Good Shoe

Photography: Self-Service Magazine

Photography: Self-Service Magazine

One of the thrills, for me, when it comes to shoes, is that they elevate my spirit so much that I feel weightless.

Like a feather I float along, feeling the psychological power brought on by my shoe selection. There is a reason those ruby red slippers had the power to take Dorothy home.

Don’t EVER underestimate the investment in a good pair of shoes. They will give back to you in ways you had never expected. So if you have to scrimp and save for that pair that you have been dreaming about, please do, because they will be well worth there weight/wait in gold. -tM

Introducing... Étant

So here it is, the first production of my designs. Étant. Inspired by movement, simplicity, and versatility. My pieces encapsulate the vital force of being. They were designed to be lived in, encouraging one to "just be."  It's a state of mind really, but then again, isn't it always. -tM

Exclusively sold  @shopfawn.

9 1/2 Weeks Style

I had forgotten how many great fashion moments there were in the film 9 1/2 Weeks. 

This Vogue shoot with Anja Rubik clearly took inspiration from some of the more evocative scenes. However, throughout the film I loved the play on the masculine and feminine, of the evocative and powerful, of soft and hard. The exploration of our dual nature is also reflected externally in the films choice of fashion and design. 

It is well worth watching again just for the fashion and design inspiration. -tM

Ruffle Me This

Photography: The Line

So here we are again, on point and on trend with our friend the ruffle.

A little known (unknown) historical fact about the ruffle is that is originated in men's fashion. It was inspired by the Spanish, others would argue German soldiers who wore two layers of shirts one over the other in the 15th century. Often they would return home from battle with the outer shirt torn to shreds; idealized for their courage, they in turn inspired the towns men to shred their own shirts in want of being affiliated with the glory of combat. As a result it wasn't uncommon for them to pull out the inner layer of cloth through the shredded layer for decorative affects, creating a wrinkled wave pattern in the material which went on to become a fashionable trend.

It was soon after this,  that most of Europe began to modify their clothes to have the same impact. First it was the string around the collar creating  pleats around the neck, then there was the Spanish ruff, an entirely separate piece that was tied around the neck. However, it wasn't until  the 17th century that the French mastered and designed the soft ruffle is still on display today. Men and women wore it around their wrists and their collars throughout the 15-19th century, in the most loud and proud of ways.

It is a sartorial detail that was forced out of men's fashion by the 20th century and deemed no longer acceptable. It became strictly affiliated with Southern femininity. And the ruffle in battle quickly became replaced with the Croatian Cravat during WWI.

There is something very appealing about the softness of the ruffle in contrast to the harsh realities of our world these days. Perhaps that has always been the case, even looking back. However, I find it interesting to note that the ruffle always has its moment when the world is too much with us. It has become a clear statement of delicate womanhood. Perhaps the world of fashion is also telling us that in a time like this, we could all us a little more feminine energy in our lives. -tM